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Saturday, October 27, 2012

Repost: Ranks of poor workers rising in Philippines - while dwindling in China, Vietnam

MANILA - Poor workers in other Asian countries are escaping poverty with greater success than their counterparts in the Philippines, according to the National Statistical Coordination Board.

"It is really not enough that we provide jobs to Filipinos, but more importantly, these should be quality jobs to ensure that they have enough income to eventually move out of poverty. Ang hirap naman na nagtatrabaho ka na nga, tapos mahirap ka pa rin!" said Jose Ramon G. Albert, NSCB secretary general.

According to Albert, the proportion of employed Filipinos living on less than $1 per day stood at 27.2 percent in 2006, higher than the 18.7 percent in 2003. In 1991, the country's working poor comprised 37.1 percent of the population.

The Philippines has more poor workers than Vietnam, where 20.4 percent were considered in the same situation in 2006, down from 22.7 percent in 2004 and 71.5 percent in 1995. China’s working poor comprised 73.1 percent of the population in 1992, then went down to 18.3 percent in 2005. 

"In both these countries, the share of employed persons in agriculture, forestry, and hunting has been decreasing while the share of those in manufacturing has been increasing. In other words, the poor (from agriculture) managed to exit from poverty by getting better employment," Albert said, referring to the situations in Vietnam and China.

The Philippine manufacturing sector has suffered a declining share of total employment, with the services sector taking up the slack, Albert said.

Where are the Filipino working poor employed? According to Albert, poor Filipinos were still working in agriculture, forestry and hunting as of 2006 and 2009.

"Our country’s poor, largely in the agriculture sector, need to improve their incomes, perhaps by getting non-farm incomes," Albert said, adding that 59.3 percent of the working poor had finished only primary school at the most. 

"However, we would still think that they could get absorbed into manufacturing which may give them better wages, or, get engaged in trade," Albert said.

The NSCB chief said the Philippines’ unemployment rate of 7 percent in 2011 is the highest among neighboring countries: Thailand, 0.7 percent; Vietnam, 2 percent; Malaysia, 3.1 percent; China, 4.1 percent; and Indonesia, 6.6 percent.

"Further, there is a remarkable transition of employment structure among the six Asian countries above from agriculture sector to manufacturing and other sectors between 1994 and 2011," Albert said. 

He said poverty incidence in Vietnam went down to 16.9 percent in 2008 from 63.7 percent in 1993, while China's slid to 13.1 percent in 2008 from 60.2 percent in 1990.

"Specifically, the poor are concerned about looking for jobs (if they don’t have jobs) or better paying ones (if they do). They want higher income, and certainly, they look forward to lower prices of commodities to improve their living conditions. The government recognizes this, and has thus decide to focus its development thrust for 2011-2016 on inclusive growth, characterized by sustained high growth, mass employment, and poverty reduction. This includes the promotion of full employment and decent work for all," Albert said.

"However, this thrust of ‘development for all’ continues to be a big challenge. Despite socioeconomic gains and positive growth in the Philippines’ gross domestic product, the headcount poverty rate and other indicators of poverty have almost remained unchanged for almost a decade – poverty incidence among the Filipino population ranged between 24.9 to 26.5 percent during the 2006 to 2009 period," he added.

The Philippine economic growth averaged 4.7 percent since 2000. In the first half of this year, the economy grew by 6.1 percent, at the high end of the government's 5-6 percent full-year target.

Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Arsenio Baliscan had said the "big challenge" for the Philippines is to address the quality issue because underemployment has remained “quite high.”

"The manufacturing sector really has to be revived because that's where a lot of quality employment [can be created]," he said.

Repost: Akbayan hits back, seeks ouster of Red party-listers

The rivalry continues.

Groups allied with the Akbayan party-list group are urging the Commission on Elections (Comelec) to disqualify “communist party-list groups” from the 2013 elections, claiming that some P770 million in pork barrel funds were being channeled to the operations of the communist New People’s Army (NPA).

In the latest escalation of the increasingly acrimonious quarrel between the well-connected Akbayan on one hand and rival progressive groups, the People’s Advocacy for Collaboration and Empowerment (PEACE) Friday reiterated a letter-complaint it filed in the Comelec last month calling for the delisting of Bayan Muna and other groups that it said were creations of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP).

Where’s the beef?

In Sydney, Australia, where he is on an official visit, President Benigno Aquino III said he saw nothing wrong with Akbayan being part of his administration and with receiving P14 million in campaign contributions during the 2010 party-list elections from his three sisters.

“They are allied with us but it doesn’t make them any less a representative of marginalized sectors,” Aquino said of Akbayan, which as of last count has nine of its members serving as officials of the Aquino administration, two members in Congress as party-list representatives and countless others allied with the ruling Liberal Party.

“It’s one thing to ask for a delisting (of Akbayan), it’s another to prove it,” the President said.

No presidential restraint

Fr. Joe Dizon of the Kontra Daya election watchdog group said Aquino’s defense of Akbayan showed that he “did not understand the party-list system” and that he might even be pressuring the Comelec to favor that group.

“Lastly, (it shows) he cannot exercise any form of presidential restraint,” Dizon said.

Mockery of democracy

PEACE was joined in its petition in the Comelec by the New Guardians for Freedom and Democracy, People’s Advocacy for Collaboration and Empowerment and Pro Democracy Foundation of the Philippines.

Noting Comelec Chair Sixto Brillantes Jr.’s recent cleansing of the party-list system of “dubious” groups, they said he should demonstrate the same courage by similarly delisting “communist party-list groups that are not only bastardizing the system but also making a mockery of our democracy.”

The groups identified the party-list organizations Gabriela, Anakpawis, Alliance of Concerned Teachers, Kabataan and Katribu Indigenous Peoples Sectoral Party as some of the CPP fronts that “as part of their political struggle, to infiltrate, manipulate and exploit the country’s free and democratic institutions.”

According to PEACE president Agnes Lopez, the number of “communist” party-list groups in the House of Representatives has increased to 11, allowing them to corner some P770 million of pork barrel funds every year.

“If one congressman gets P70 million, these groups will be able to channel at least P770 million yearly to support the operations of the NPA or other allied organizations of the CPP,” said Lopez.

Favored group

The allegations followed reports that Akbayan had received P112 million in political contributions during the May 2010 elections, which included P14 million from the three sisters of the President.

Akbayan’s rivals, which it has described as from the “extreme Left,” regard the political contributions from the Aquinos as proof that Akbayan was the administration’s “favored party-list” group, enjoying an unfair advantage over the genuinely marginalized and under-represented organizations.

Last Wednesday, several of these so-called “extreme Left” groups led by the Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (Bayan) filed a formal complaint in the Comelec, the second such petition, asking for Akbayan’s disqualification claiming that it had ceased to become a marginalized group when many of its members and personalities were appointed to government posts.

But PEACE and the groups allied with Akbayan said it is these groups and their affiliates like Bayan Muna that should be disqualified as these organizations allegedly support violence against the state in violation of the Party-List System Act.

The giveaway

“How can party-list groups that support the overthrow of the government and the country’s political system be allowed to participate in the party-list elections? The mere fact that they made no public announcement condemning NPA atrocities or its bloody armed struggle is already a giveaway,” said Lopez.

Lopez said the Comelec was already in the right direction when it disqualified the labor-based Courage party-list group from participating in the 2013 party-list polls.

“We hope the disqualification of the Courage party-list will pave way for the total delisting of all communist party-list groups. Disqualifying one party-list will not discourage the CPP in spawning more groups. The more effective approach is to disqualify them all, including those that are currently sitting in Congress,” Lopez said.

Bayan secretary general Renato Reyes dismissed the allegations, saying these were rehashed and had been debunked before.

“These are old allegations that were already answered in the past in the Comelec, and will not prosper,” he said.

“While totally untrue, these allegations open up Bayan Muna to attacks and harassment by the (military). That is the problem. It’s the same old red-tagging,” he added.

Communists’ objective

In the letter-complaint they submitted to the Comelec in September, Lopez’s group said Bayan Muna, Gabriela, Anakpawis, Alliance of Concerned Teachers (ACT), Kabataan, and Katribu Indigenous Peoples Sectoral Party (Katribu) party-list groups were part of the communists’ plan “to infiltrate, manipulate, and exploit the country’s free and democratic institutions to support their violent and inhuman armed struggle in the countryside.”

Lopez claimed that the objective of the CPP in fielding these groups was to eventually wield substantial influence over Congress “to help in its armed revolution by providing resources and other forms of assistance.”

“It’s not a coincidence that at a time when the NPA’s numbers were dwindling because of lack of resources and the success of the (military’s) anti-insurgency operations these communist party-list groups multiplied to about 11,” she said.

Lopez warned that these leftist groups could use the NPA to “easily intimidate other party-list groups in NPA-infested areas.”

“The Bayan Muna consortium is practically assured of votes during elections because the NPA campaigns for them whereas other party-list organizations and even politicians have to pay a permit-to-campaign fee to visit NPA-controlled areas,” Lopez said.

Not illegal

Asked about his sisters’ donations to Akbayan, the President said that as long as they were not violating “spending limits,” this was not illegal.

“Is that an issue? If you’re a marginal party, or a party representing a marginalized sector, you’re not entitled to have supporters? How does a political party exist without supporters?” he said.

But he quickly added that on the issue of his sisters’ donations, he would have “to check the records.”

In the election expenditure document it submitted to the Comelec, Akbayan disclosed that it received a total of

P112 million in political contributions during the May 2010 elections.

It showed that Maria Elena “Ballsy” Aquino-Cruz and Victoria Elisa “Viel” Aquino-Dee each contributed P2 million while TV host Kris Aquino, or Kristina Bernadette, gave P10 million.

Kris’ contribution was the biggest among individual contributors. Richard Dee, Viel’s husband, gave P3 million.

Sign of public confidence

According to the statement, Akbayan received a total of P112,183,000 in contributions from individuals and political parties while its election expenditures reached P112,174,008.70.

Barry Gutierrez, Akbayan national spokesperson, explained that the contributions indicated the public’s confidence and support for Akbayan advocacies.

He said that Akbayan’s campaign during the 2010 elections was funded mainly by contributions from individual sympathizers.

“Unlike our accusers from the extreme Left, contributions to Akbayan’s electoral campaign did not come from illegal ‘taxes’ forcibly extracted from logging and mining companies under pain of their installations and equipment being burned and their personnel harmed,” he added.

In a statement, Akbayan explained that its campaign in 2010 was funded primarily by contributions from individuals who believed and supported Akbayan’s reform platform and its collaboration with then Liberal Party presidential bet, Noynoy Aquino

It said 90 percent of the total campaign expenditures went to radio and TV ads, which promoted Akbayan as Aquino’s partner.

“These contributions simply allowed us to run a more effective national campaign that ensured the continued representation of the interests of the marginalized within the corridors of government,” Akbayan stressed.

“That we received such contributions, we believe, does not take away the character of Akbayan as a party-list that represents the interests of the marginalized, but in fact indicates the confidence and support our advocacies enjoy from the broader public,” it said.

Friday, October 26, 2012

Repost: Lawyer files charges vs Bea’s camp

Lawyer Ferdinand Topacio is asking for P5,000,000.00 for moral damages, P500,000.00 for exemplary damages and P230,000.00 for legal fees and expenses from Carina Binene, mother of Kapuso star Bea Binene and GMA officers Simon Ferrer, Lynn Delfin and Atty. Flordeliza Vargas.

In his affidavit, Topacio, who filed the charges on October 25 in Tanuan, Batangas, said that the defendants ruined his good name.

Topacio made the move after Bea’s camp refused to issue the public apology the lawyer demanded over what he said are false claims they issued against him.

The issue started when Topacio filed a child abuse case against radio disc jockey Dan Christian Villanueva, a.k.a. Papa Dan on Bea’s behalf at the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) last Sept. 3.

Since Papa Dan stayed at the Binenes’ guest house for seven months without pay, Carina allegedly sought Topacio’s legal advice.

GMA Artist Center, meanwhile, said Topacio was not authorized to file the child abuse case and that it has assigned Vargas as Bea’s legal counsel instead.

Bea and her camp just laughed off the prospect of a public apology and insisted they have pieces of evidences to defend themselves.

As for Bea and Papa Dan, the issue has since been resolved and considered closed.

Article Source: Maridol Rañoa-Bismark , Yahoo! News

Osmeña says House won’t pass anti-dynasty bill even if Senate does

So here we are talking about the Anti-dynasty Bill, the target of which are the dynasties of both effective and ineffective political families. I guess it's high time that the Anti-dynasty Bill be passed in both Houses, so that everyone will be given a chance to lead and cause change in Philippine society. Hope before PNoy's term ends, we get to rid big portions if not the entire of unworthy political leaders.

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The Senate, even with dynastic members, could conceivably approve an antidynasty bill but it will only be stopped dead at the even more dynast-ridden House of Representatives, according to Sen. Sergio Osmeña III.

Osmeña, a member of a political family himself, said it would be futile for the Senate, which is deliberating on an anti-dynasty bill filed by Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, to pass the bill, only for the House to sit on it until Congress adjourns.

“Get it passed in the House first. It will pass the Senate,” he said.

The senator recalled how in 1995, the Senate was about to tackle a committee report on an antidynasty bill when a House leader let it be known that the measure would not get past the lower chamber.

‘Don’t bother’

According to Osmeña, then Sen. Orlando Mercado, whose committee was about to file a report on the bill, called his House counterpart and asked the latter: Would you pass this measure?

“[The House member] said, ‘don’t bother to send us that bill, it will never pass the House.’ So nothing came of it. The bill was junked and archived,” he said.

Osmeña said the reason why the House would never pass such a measure is “because at the local level, they (House members) let their wives run.”

Conversely, a Senate dominated by a few family names would pass an anti-dynasty bill “because the Senate cannot be considered a dynasty,” he argued.

“Unless you want to stretch it that if you are related you cannot serve at the same time in the Senate,” Osmeña said.

For instance, the senator said that if his cousin, former senator John Osmeña, were to decide to run again for senator and wins, their terms would overlap, but it would not be a dynasty.

No Osmeña dynasty

“That’s not a dynasty because he’s elected on his own and I have no control over the entire Philippines that I can get him elected,” Osmeña said.

Dynasticism would only come in if there is influence on the voters by the incumbent, he argued.

Osmeña recalled that in the 1995 antidynasty bill, political dynasty was defined as involving the influence wielded by one family over a particular area.

He explained that if a member of a family was the governor in a province and another wanted to run for mayor in one of the province’s towns, the situation would fall under the definition of a political dynasty.

By contrast, if the brother of an incumbent governor of one province runs for governor in another, that would not be a political dynasty, he said, as there would be no undue influence by the incumbent governor over the voters of the province where the brother would run for governor.

At the national level, “if I’m President and my cousin wants to run for senator, that would be a dynasty,” he said.




Thursday, October 25, 2012

RH Bill version introduced at Lower House


Below is a copy of the proposed new version of the Reproductive Health Bill (RH Bill) introduced at the House of Representatives on October 18 (Wednesay). This proposed RH Bill revision contains new "acceptable" amendments marked either by bold-faced words for new terms added and braced words for deleted parts of the Bill.

SEC. 1. Title

This Act shall be known as the “The Responsible Parenthood, Reproductive Health and Population and Development Act of 2011.”

SEC. 2. Declaration of Policy

The State recognizes and guarantees the exercise of the universal basic human right to reproductive health by all persons, particularly of parents, couples and women, consistent with their religious convictions, cultural beliefs and the demands of responsible parenthood. Toward this end, there shall be no discrimination against any person on grounds such as gender [replaced the word "sex"], age, religion, disabilities, political affiliation and ethnicity. [The phrase "sexual orientation was also deleted from this list.]

Moreover, the State recognizes and guarantees the promotion of gender equality, equity and women’s empowerment as a health and human rights concern. The advancement and protection of women’s human rights shall be central to the efforts of the State to address reproductive health care. As a distinct but inseparable measure to the guarantee of women’s human rights, the State recognizes and guarantees the promotion of the welfare and rights of children.

The State likewise guarantees public [replaced the word "universal"] access to relevant information and education on medically-safe, legal, ethical, affordable, effective and 

quality reproductive health care services, methods, devices and supplies which do not prevent the implantation of a fertilized ovum as determined by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and shall prioritize the needs of poor women and men in marginalized households as identified through the National Household Targeting System for Poverty Reduction (NHTS-PR) and other government measures of identifying marginalization, who shall be voluntary beneficiaries of reproductive health care, services and supplies for free.


The State shall also promote opennes to life, provided that parents bring forth to the world only those children that they can raise in a truly humane way.

The State shall eradicate discriminatory practices, laws and policies that infringe on a person’s exercise of reproductive health rights.

SEC. 3. Guiding Principles

This Act declares the following as guiding principles:

a. Freedom of choice, which is central to the exercise of right must be fully guaranteed by the State;

b. Respect for, protection and fulfillment of reproductive health and rights seek to promote the rights and welfare of couples, adult individuals, women and adolescents;

c. Since human resource is among the principal asset of the country, maternal health, birth of healthy children and their full human development and responsible parenting must be ensured through effective reproductive health care;

d. The provision of medically safe, legal, accessible, affordable and effective reproductive health care services and supplies is essential in the promotion of people’s right to health, especially of the poor and marginalized;

e. The State shall promote, without bias, all effective natural and modern methods of family planning that are medically safe and legal for the poor and marginalized as identified through the NHTS-PR and other government measures of identifying marginalization: provided, that the State shall also provide funding support to promote modern natural methods of family planning consistent with the needs of acceptors;

f. The State shall promote programs that: (1) enable couples, individuals and women to have the number and spacing of children they desire with due consideration to the health of women and resources available to them; (2) achieve equitable allocation and utilization of resources; (3) ensure effective partnership among the national government, local government units and the private sector in the design, implementation, coordination, integration, monitoring and evaluation of people-centered programs to enhance quality of life and environmental protection; (4) conduct studies to analyze demographic trends towards sustainable human development and (5) conduct scientific studies to determine safety and efficacy ofalternative medicines and methods for reproductive health care development;

g. The provision of reproductive health information, care and supplies for poor beneficiaries as identified through the NHTS-PR and other government measures of identifying marginalization shall be the joint responsibility of the National Government and Local Government Units;

h. Active participation by non-government, women’s, people’s, civil society organizations and communities is crucial to ensure that reproductive health and population and development policies, plans, and programs will address the priority needs of the poor, especially women;

i. While this Act recognizes that abortion is illegal and punishable by law, the government shall ensure that all women needing care for post-abortion complications shall be treated and counseled in a humane, non-judgmental and compassionate manner;

j. There shall be no demographic or population targets and the mitigation, promotion and/or stabilization of the population growth rate is incidental to the advancement [replaced the word "promotion"] of reproductive health and sustainable human development;

k. Gender equality and women empowerment are central elements of reproductive health and population and development;

l. The [the word "limited" was deleted] resources of the country must be made to serve the entire population, especially the poor, and make allocations thereof adequate and effective;

m. Development is a multi-faceted process that calls for the coordination and integration of policies, plans, programs and projects that seek to uplift the quality of life of the people, more particularly the poor, the needy and the marginalized; and

n. That a comprehensive reproductive health program addresses the needs of people throughout their life cycle.

SEC. 4. Definition of Terms

For the purposes of this Act, the following terms shall be defined as follows:

Adolescence refers to the period of physical and physiological development of an individual from the onset of puberty to complete growth and maturity which usually begins between 11 to 13 years and terminating at 18 to 20 years of age;

Adolescent Sexuality refers to, among others, the reproductive system, gender identity, values and beliefs, emotions, relationships and sexual behavior at adolescence;

AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) refers to a condition characterized by a combination of signs and symptoms, caused by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) which attacks and weakens the body’s immune system, making the afflicted individual susceptible to other life-threatening infections;

Anti-Retroviral Medicines (ARVs) refers to medications for the treatment of infection by retroviruses, primarily HIV;

Basic Emergency Obstetric Care refers to lifesaving services for maternal complications being provided by a health facility or professional, which must include the following six signal functions: administration of parenteral antibiotics; administration of parenteral oxytocic drugs; administration of parenteral anticonvulsants for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia; manual removal of placenta; removal of retained products; and assisted vaginal delivery;

Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Care refers to basic emergency obstetric care including performance of caesarian section and blood transfusion;

Family Planning refers to a program which enables couples, individuals and women to decide freely and responsibly the number and spacing of their children, acquire relevant information on reproductive health care, services and supplies and have access to a full range of safe, legal, affordable, effective and modern methods of limiting and spacing pregnancy;

Gender Equality refers to the absence of discrimination on the basis of a person’s sex, sexual orientation and gender identity in opportunities, allocation of resources or benefits and access to services;

Gender Equity refers to fairness and justice in the distribution of benefits and responsibilities between women and men, and often requires women-specific projects and programs to end existing inequalities;

Healthcare Service Provider refers to (1) health care institution, which is duly licensed and accredited and devoted primarily to the maintenance and operation of facilities for health promotion, disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care of individuals suffering from illness, disease, injury, disability or deformity, or in need of obstetrical or other medical and nursing care; (2) a health care professional, who is a doctor of medicine, nurse, or midwife; (3) public health worker engaged in the delivery of health care services; and (4) barangay health worker who has undergone training programs under any accredited government and non-government organization and who voluntarily renders primarily health care services in the community after having been accredited to function as such by the local health board in accordance with the guidelines promulgated by the Department of Health (DOH);

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) refers to the virus which causes AIDS;

Male Responsibility refers to the involvement, commitment, accountability, and responsibility of males in relation to women in all areas of sexual and reproductive health as well as the protection and promotion of reproductive health concerns specific to men;

Maternal Death Review refers to a qualitative and in-depth study of the causes of maternal death with the primary purpose of preventing future deaths through changes or additions to programs, plans and policies;

Modern Methods of Family Planning refers to safe, effective and legal methods, whether natural or artificial that are registered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the Department of Health (DOH) to plan [replaced the word "prevent"] pregnancy;

People Living with HIV (PLWH) refers to individuals whose HIV tests indicate that they are infected with HIV;

Poor refers to members of households identified as poor through the National Household Targeting System for poverty reduction by the DSWD or any subsequent system used by the national government in identifying the poor.

Population and Development refers to a program that aims to: (1) help couples and parents achieve their desired family size; (2) improve reproductive health of individuals by addressing reproductive health problems; (3) contribute to decreased maternal and infant mortality rates and early child mortality; (4) reduce incidence of teenage pregnancy; and (5) recognize the linkage between population and sustainable human development;

Reproductive Health refers to the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, in all matters relating to the reproductive system and to its functions and processes;

Reproductive Health Care refers to the access to a full range of methods, facilities, services and supplies that contribute to reproductive health and well-being by preventing and solving reproductive health-related problems. It also includes sexual health, the purpose of which is the enhancement of life and personal relations. The elements of reproductive health care include:

(a) family planning information and services which shall include as a first priority making women of reproductive age fully aware of their respective fertility cycles;

(b) maternal, infant and child health and nutrition, including breastfeeding;

(c) proscription of abortion and management of abortion complications;

(d) adolescent and youth reproductive health;

(e) prevention and management of reproductive tract infections (RTIs), HIV and AIDS and other sexually transmittable infections (STIs);

(f) elimination of violence against women;

(g) education and counseling on sexuality and reproductive health;

(h) treatment of breast and reproductive tract cancers and other gynecological conditions and disorders;

(i) male responsibility and participation in reproductive health;

(j) prevention and treatment of infertility and sexual dysfunction;

(k) reproductive health education for the adolescents; and


(l) mental health aspects of RH care;
Reproductive Health Care Program refers to the systematic and integrated provision of reproductive health care to all citizens especially the poor, marginalized and those in vulnerable and crisis situations;



Reproductive Health Rights refer to the rights of couples, individuals and women to decide freely and responsibly whether or not to have children; to determine the number, spacing and timing of their children; to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence; to have relevant information; and to attain the highest condition of sexual and reproductive health;
Reproductive Health and Sexuality Education refers to a lifelong learning process of providing and acquiring complete, accurate and relevant information and education on reproductive health and sexuality through life skills education and other approaches;

Reproductive Tract Infection (RTI) refers to sexually transmitted infections, and other types of infections affecting the reproductive system;

Responsible Parenthood refers to the will, ability and commitment of parents to adequately respond to the needs and aspirations of the family and children by responsibly and freely exercising their reproductive health rights consistent with their religious conviction;

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) refers to any infection that may be acquired or passed on through sexual contact;

Skilled Attendant refers to an accredited health professional, such as midwife, doctor or nurse, who has been educated and trained in the skills needed to manage normal and complicated pregnancies, childbirth and the immediate postnatal period, and in the identification, management and referral of complications in women and newborns, to exclude traditional birth attendant or hilot, whether trained or not;

Skilled Birth Attendance refers to childbirth managed by a skilled attendant including the enabling conditions of necessary equipment and support of a functioning health system, and the transport and referral facilities for emergency obstetric care; and

Sustainable Human Development refers to bringing people, particularly the poor and vulnerable, to the center of development process, the central purpose of which is the creation of an enabling environment in which all can enjoy long, healthy and productive lives, and done in a manner that promotes their rights and protects the life opportunities of future generations and the natural ecosystem on which all life depends.

SEC. 5. Midwives for Skilled Attendance

The Local Government Units (LGUs) with the assistance of the Department of Health (DOH), shall employ an adequate number of midwives to achieve a minimum ratio of one (1) fulltime skilled birth attendant for every one hundred fifty (150) deliveries per year, to be based on the annual number of actual deliveries or live births for the past two years; Provided, That people in geographically isolated and depressed areas shall be provided the same level of access

SEC. 6. Emergency Obstetric Care

Each province and city, with the assistance of the DOH, shall establish or upgrade hospitals with adequate and qualified personnel, equipment and supplies to be able to provide emergency obstetric care. For every 500,000 population, there shall be at least one (1) hospital with comprehensive emergency obstetric care and four (4) hospitals or other health facilities with basic emergency obstetric care; Provided, That people in geographically isolated and depressed areas shall be provided the same level of access.

SEC. 7. Access to Family Planning

All accredited health facilities shall provide a full range of modern family planning methods, except in the case of specialty hospitals and hospitals owned and operated by a religious group: however, these hospitals render such services on an optional basis. For poor patients, such services shall be fully covered by PhilHealth Insurance and/or government financial assistance on a no balance billing.

After the use of any PhilHealth benefit involving childbirth and all other pregnancy-related services, if the indigent/sponsored beneficiary wishes to space or prevent her next pregnancy, PhilHealth shall pay for the full cost of family planning.

SEC. 8. Maternal and Newborn Health Care in Crisis Situations

Local government units and the Department of Health shall ensure that a Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for reproductive health, including maternal and neonatal health care kits and services as defined by the DOH, will be given proper attention in crisis situations such as disasters and humanitarian crises. MISP shall become part of all responses by national agencies at the onset of crisis and emergencies.

Temporary facilities such as evacuation centers and refugee camps shall be equipped to respond to the special needs in the following situations: normal deliveries, pregnancy complications, miscarriage and post-abortion complications, spread of HIV and STIs, and sexual and gender-based violence and have a system of referral for complicated deliveries.

SEC. 9. Maternal Death Review

All Local Government Units (LGUs), national and local government hospitals, and other public health units shall conduct annual maternal death review in accordance with the guidelines set by the DOH.

SEC. 10. Role of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shall determine the safety, efficacy and classification of products and supplies for modern family planning methods prior to their distribution, procurement, sale and use.

The FDA shall update the Philippine National Drug Formulary (PNDF) with respect to the aforesaid products and supplies in accordance with standard medical practice. [This replaced the section on "Family Planning Supplies as Essential Medicines."]


SEC. 11. Procurement and Distribution of Family Planning Supplies

The DOH shall spearhead the efficient procurement, distribution to Local Government Units (LGUs) and usage-monitoring of family planning supplies for the whole country covering poor households identified through the NHTS-PR and other government measures of identifying marginalization. The DOH shall coordinate with all appropriate LGUs to plan and implement this procurement and distribution program. The supply and budget allotments shall be based on, among others, the current levels and projections of the following:

“(a) number of women of reproductive age and couples who want to space or limit their children;

“(b) contraceptive prevalence rate, by type of method used; and

“(c) Cost of family planning supplies.

SEC. 12. Integration of Family Planning and Responsible Parenthood Component in Anti-Poverty Programs


A multi-dimensional approach shall be adopted in the implementation of policies and programs to fight poverty. Towards this end, the DOH shall implement programs that ensure full access of poor and marginalized women as identified through the NHTS-PR and other government measures of identifying marginalization to reproductive health care, services, products and programs. The DOH shall provide such programs technical support, including capacity-building and monitoring.



SEC. 13. Roles of Local Government in Family Planning Programs

The LGUs shall ensure that poor families receive preferential access to services, commodities and programs for family planning. The role of Population Officers at municipal, city and barangay levels in the family planning effort shall be strengthened. The Barangay Health Workers and Volunteers shall be capacitated to help implement this Act.

SEC. 14. Benefits for Serious and Life-Threatening Reproductive Health Conditions

All serious and life threatening reproductive health conditions such as HIV and AIDS, breast and reproductive tract cancers, obstetric complications, menopausal and post-menopausal related conditions shall be given the maximum benefits as provided by PhilHealth programs.

SEC. 15. Mobile Health Care Service

Each Congressional District may be provided with at least one (1) Mobile Health Care Service (MHCS) in the form of a van or other means of transportation appropriate to coastal or mountainous areas, the procurement and operation of which shall be funded by the National Government. The MHCS shall deliver health care supplies and services to constituents, more particularly to the poor and needy, and shall be used to disseminate knowledge and information on reproductive health. [deleted sentence: "The purchase of the MHCS shall be funded from the Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF) of each Congressional District."] The operation and maintenance of the MHCS shall be done [replaced the word "operated"] by skilled health providers adequately equipped with an equipment, the latter including, but not limited to, a television set for audio-visual presentations. All MHCS shall be operated by a focal city or municipality within a congressional district.

SEC. 16. Mandatory Age-Appropriate Reproductive Health and Sexuality Education

Age-appropriate Reproductive Health and Sexuality Education shall be taught by adequately trained teachers in formal and non-formal educational system starting from Grade Six [replaced the word "Five"] up to Fourth Year High School using life-skills and other approaches. Reproductive Health and Sexuality Education shall commence at the start of the school year immediately following one (1) year from the effectivity of this Act to allow the training of concerned teachers. The Department of Education (DepEd), the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), and the Department of Health (DOH) shall formulate the Reproductive Health and Sexuality Education curriculum. Such curriculum shall be common to both public and private schools, out of school youth programs, and Alternative Learning System (ALS) based on, but not limited to psycho-social and physical wellbeing, the demography, reproductive health, and the legal aspects of reproductive health with due deference to the cultural, religious and ethical norms of various communities.
Age-appropriate reproductive health and sexuality education shall be integrated in all relevant subjects and shall include, but not limited to, the following topics:

“(a) Values formation with due regard to religious and other affiliations;

“(b) Knowledge and skills in self protection against discrimination, sexual violence and abuse, and teen pregnancy;

“(c) Physical, social and emotional changes in adolescents;

“(d) Children’s and women’s rights;

“(e) Fertility awareness;

“(f) STI, HIV and AIDS;

“(g) Population and development;

“(h) Responsible relationship;

“(i) Family planning methods;

‘(j) Proscription and hazards of abortion;

“(k) Gender and development;

“(l) Responsible parenthood; and

“(m) Proper and responsible sexual values and behavior; delayed entry into sexual relations; abstinence before marriage; avoidance of multiple sexual partners; and prevention of the spread of sexuality transmitted diseases.

The DepEd, DSWD, and DOH shall provide concerned parents with adequate and relevant scientific materials on the age-appropriate topics and manner of teaching reproductive health education to their children.

Parents may exercise the option of not allowing their minor children to attend classes pertaining to reproductive health and sexuality education.

Flexibility in the teaching of reproductive health and sexuality education shall be accorded to sectarian schools within the provisions and parameters of this section.

SEC. 17. Additional Duty of the Local Population Officer

Each Local Population Officer of every city and municipality shall furnish free instructions and information on family planning, responsible parenthood, breastfeeding, infant nutrition and other relevant aspects of this Act to all applicants for marriage license. In the absence of a local Population Officer, a Family Planning Officer under the Local Health Office shall discharge the additional duty of the Population Officer.

SEC. 18. Certificate of Compliance

No marriage license shall be issued by the Local Civil Registrar unless the applicants present a Certificate of Compliance issued for free by the local Family Planning Office certifying that they had duly received adequate instructions and information on family planning, responsible parenthood, breastfeeding and infant nutrition.

SEC. 19. Capability Building of Barangay Health Workers

Barangay Health Workers and other community-based health workers shall undergo training on the promotion of reproductive health and shall receive at least 10% increase in honoraria, upon successful completion of training. The amount necessary for the increase in honoraria shall be charged against the Maintenance and Other Operating Expenses (MOOE) component of the Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) program of the DSWD. In the event the CCT is phased out, the funding sources shall be charged against the Gender and Development (GAD) budget or the development fund component of the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA).

SEC. 20. Pro Bono Services for Indigent Women

Private and non-government reproductive health care service providers, including but not limited to gynecologists and obstetricians, are mandated to provide at least 48 hours annually of reproductive health services ranging from providing information and education, to rendering medical services free of charge to indigent and low income patients as identified through the NHTS-PR and other government measures of identifying marginalization, especially to pregnant adolescents. These 48 hours annual pro bono services shall be included as prerequisite in the accreditation under the PhilHealth.

SEC. 21. Sexual And Reproductive Health Programs For Persons With Disabilities (PWDs)
The cities and municipalities must ensure that barriers to reproductive health services for persons with disabilities are obliterated by the following:

“(a) providing physical access, and resolving transportation and proximity issues to clinics, hospitals and places where public health education is provided, contraceptives are sold or distributed or other places where reproductive health services are provided;

“(b) adapting examination tables and other laboratory procedures to the needs and conditions of persons with disabilities;

“(c) increasing access to information and communication materials on sexual and reproductive health in braille, large print, simple language, and pictures;

“(d) providing continuing education and inclusion rights of persons with disabilities among health-care providers; and

“(e) undertaking activities to raise awareness and address misconceptions among the general public on the stigma and their lack of knowledge on the sexual and reproductive health needs and rights of persons with disabilities.

SEC. 22. Right to Reproductive Health Care Information

The government shall guarantee the right of any person to provide or receive non-fraudulent information about the availability of reproductive health care services, including family planning, and prenatal care particularly in poor households as identified through the NHTS-PR and other government measures of identifying marginalization.

The DOH and the Philippine Information Agency (PIA) shall initiate and sustain a heightened nationwide multi-media campaign to raise the level of public awareness of the protection and promotion of reproductive health and rights including family planning and population and development.

SEC. 23. Implementing Mechanisms
Pursuant to the herein declared policy, the DOH and the Local Health Units in cities and municipalities shall serve as the lead agencies for the implementation of this Act among poor households as identified by NHTS-PR and other government measures of identifying marginalization and shall integrate in their regular operations the following functions:

“(a) Ensure full and efficient implementation of the Reproductive Health Care Program;

“(b) Ensure people’s access to medically safe, legal, effective, quality and affordable reproductive health supplies and services;

“(c) Ensure that reproductive health services are delivered with a full range of supplies, facilities and equipment and that service providers are adequately trained for such reproductive health care delivery;

“(d) Take active steps to expand the coverage of the National Health Insurance Program (NHIP), especially among poor and marginalized women, to include the full range of reproductive health services and supplies as health insurance benefits;

“(e) Strengthen the capacities of health regulatory agencies to ensure safe, legal, effective, quality, accessible and affordable reproductive health services and commodities with the concurrent strengthening and enforcement of regulatory mandates and mechanisms;

“(f) Promulgate a set of minimum reproductive health standards for public health facilities, which shall be included in the criteria for accreditation. These minimum reproductive health standards shall provide for the monitoring of pregnant mothers, and a minimum package of reproductive health programs that shall be available and affordable at all levels of the public health system except in specialty hospitals where such services are provided on optional basis;

“(g) Facilitate the involvement and participation of non-government organizations and the private sector in reproductive health care service delivery and in the production, distribution and delivery of quality reproductive health and family planning supplies and commodities to make them accessible and affordable to ordinary citizens;

“(h) Furnish local government units with appropriate information and resources to keep them updated on current studies and researches relating to family planning, responsible parenthood, breastfeeding and infant nutrition; and
“(i) Perform such other functions necessary to attain the purposes of this Act.
The Population Commission, (POPCOM) as an attached agency of DOH, shall serve as the coordinating body in the implementation of Sections 7, 10, 11, 13, 17, 19, 21 and 23 of this Act and shall have the following functions:

“(a) Integrate on a continuing basis the interrelated reproductive health and population development agenda consistent with the herein declared national policy which does not include population control, taking into account regional and local concerns;

“(b) Provide the mechanism to ensure active and full participation of the private sector and the citizenry through their organizations in the planning and implementation of reproductive health care and population and development programs and projects; and

“(c) Conduct sustained and effective information drives on sustainable human development and on all methods of family planning to prevent unintended, unplanned and mistimed pregnancies.

SEC. 24. Reporting Requirements

Before the end of April of each year, the DOH shall submit an annual report to the President of the Philippines, the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. The report shall provide a definitive and comprehensive assessment of the implementation of its programs and those of other Government agencies and instrumentalities, civil society and the private sector and recommend appropriate priorities for executive and legislative actions. The report shall be printed and distributed to all national agencies, the LGUs, civil society and the private sector organizations involved in said programs.

The annual report shall evaluate the content, implementation and impact of all policies related to reproductive health and family planning to ensure that such policies promote, protect and fulfill reproductive health and rights, particularly of parents, couples and women.

SEC. 25. Congressional Oversight Committee (COC)

There is hereby created a Congressional Oversight Committee composed of five (5) members from the Senate and five (5) members from the House of Representatives. The members from the Senate shall be appointed by the Senate President based on proportional representation of the parties or coalition therein with at least one (1) member representing the Minority. The members from the House of Representatives shall be appointed by the Speaker, also based on proportional representation of the parties or coalitions therein with at least one (1) member representing the Minority.

The COC shall be jointly chaired [replaced the word "headed"] by the respective Chairs of the Senate Committee on Youth, Women and Family Relations and the House of Representatives Committee on Population and Family Relations.

The Secretariat of the Congressional Oversight Committee shall come from the existing Secretariat personnel of the Senate’ and the House of Representatives’ committees concerned

The Committee shall monitor and ensure the effective implementation of this Act, determine the possible [replaced the word "inherent"] weakness in the law, recommend the necessary remedial legislator or administrative measures and perform such other duties and functions as may be necessary to attain the objectives of this Act.

SEC. 26. Prohibited Acts

The following acts are prohibited:

“(a) Any healthcare service provider, whether public or private, who shall:

“(1) Knowingly withhold information or restrict the dissemination thereof, and/or intentionally provide incorrect information regarding programs and services on reproductive health, including the right to informed choice and access to a full range of legal, medically-safe and effective family planning methods;

“(2) Refuse to perform legal and medically safe reproductive health procedures on any person of legal age on the ground of lack of consent or authorization of the following persons in the following instances: (a) spousal consent in case of married persons, provided that, in case of disagreement, the decision of the one undergoing the procedure shall prevails, and (b) parental consent or that of the person exercising parental authority in the case of abused minors, where the parent or the person exercising parental authority is the respondent, accused or convicted perpetrator as certified by the proper prosecutorial office or the court; and

“(3) Refuse to extend health care services and information on account of the person’s marital status, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, personal circumstances, or nature of work; Provided, That, the objection of a healthcare service provider based on his/her ethical or religious beliefs shall be respected; however, he/she shall, without in anyway agreeing or endorsing the family planning service or procedure by the person concerned, shall immediately refer the person seeking such care and services to another healthcare service provider within the same facility or one which is conveniently accessible who is willing to provide the requisite information and services; Provided, further, That the person is not in an emergency condition or serious case as defined in RA 8344 penalizing the refusal of hospitals and medical clinics to administer appropriate initial medical treatment and support in emergency and serious cases.

“(b) Any public official charged with the duty to implement the provisions of this act, who personally or through a subordinate, prohibits or restricts the delivery of legal and medically-safe reproductive health care services, including family planning; or forces, coerces or induces any person to use such services.

“(c) Any employer or his representative who shall require an employee or applicant, as a condition for employment or continued employment, to undergo sterilization or use or not use any family planning method; neither shall pregnancy be a ground for non-hiring or termination of employment; and

“(d) Any person who shall falsify a certificate of compliance as required in Section 18 of this Act.

(e) Any pharmaceutical company, whether domestic or multi-national, or its agents or distributors, which (1) shall collude with government officials, whether appointed or elected, in the distribution, procurement and/or sale by the national government and local government units (LGUs) of modern family planning supplies, products and devices; and/or (2) contribute money or anything of value to partisan political activities involving a government official, whether appointed or elected, and/or any candidate for any elective position, whether national or local.

SEC. 27. Penalties

Any violation of this Act or commission of the foregoing prohibited acts shall be penalized by imprisonment ranging from one (1) month to six (6) months or a fine of Ten Thousand (P 10,000.00) to Fifty Thousand Pesos (P 50,000.00) or both such fine and imprisonment at the discretion of the competent court; Provided That, if the offender is a public official or employee, he or she shall suffer the accessory penalty of dismissal from the government service and forfeiture of retirement benefits. If the offender is a juridical person, the penalty shall be imposed upon the president or any responsible officer. An offender who is an alien shall, after service of sentence, be deported immediately without further proceedings by the Bureau of Immigration. If the offender is a pharmaceutical company, its agent and/or distributor, their license or permit to operate or conduct business in the Philippines shall be perpetually revoked, and a fine triple the amount involved in the violation shall be imposed.

SEC. 28. Appropriations

The amounts appropriated in the current annual General Appropriations Act (GAA) for Family Health and Responsible Parenting under the DOH and POPCOM, upon the effectivity of this act, and other concerned agencies shall be allocated and utilized for the initial implementation of this Act. Such additional sums necessary to implement this Act; provide for the upgrading of facilities necessary to meet Basic Emergency Obstetric Careand Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Carestandards; train and deploy skilled health providers; procure family planning supplies and commodities as provided in Sec. 10; and implement other reproductive health services, shall be included in the subsequent GAA.

SEC. 29. Implementing Rules and Regulations

Within sixty (60) days from the effectivity of this Act, the Secretary of the DOH shall formulate and adopt amendments to the existing rules and regulations to carry out the objectives of this Act, in consultation with the Secretaries of the DepED, the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), the DSWD, the Director General of the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA), and the Commissioner of the CHED, the Philippine Commission on Women (PCW), and two Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) or Peoples’ Organizations (POs) for women. Full dissemination of the Implementing Rules and Regulations to the public shall be ensured.

SEC. 30-33. Separability Clause, Repealing Clause, Effectivity

SEC. 30. Separability Clause. – If any part or provision of this Act is held invalid or unconstitutional, other provisions not affected thereby shall remain in force and effect.

SEC. 31. Repealing Clause. All other laws, decrees, orders, issuances, rules and regulations which are inconsistent with the provisions of this Act are hereby repealed, amended or modified accordingly.

SEC. 32. Effectivity. – This Act shall take effect fifteen (15) days after its publication in at least two (2) newspapers of general circulation.

Approved,

Mario Maurer Live in Manila on October 28

Thai superstar Mario Maurer will be in Manila on October 28 (Sunday) for the grand fans day and promotion of his movie with Filipino actress Erich Gonzales under reputable film production company Star Cinema. The title of the movie will be Suddenly It’s Magic, the trailer of which may be found here.

One report by Manila Bulletin reveals that Mario’s visit to the Philippines will be exclusively covered by ABS-CBN which was awarded all the rights to exclusive coverage (including TV guestings) of the A Crazy Little Thing Called Love actor.

A Mario Maurer fan conference will be held in Manila at the PICC Plenary Hall on October 28 at 1 PM. This will be give his fans the opportunity to meet and greet the Mario Maurer. The event, which will be hosted by VJ Utt, will present a special live performance by pop Asian group Blush.

Penology Officer August 2012 Exam Results now out

The Civil Service Commission (CSC) has finally released the results of the August 2012 Penology Officer Examination (POE) conducted in various testing centers.

The CSC advise all POE passers to personally claim their original Certificate of Eligibility (CoE) at the CSC Regional/Field Office where they filed their application.


Region 1 (San Fernando City, La Union)


Sequence No. | Examinee Number | Name
1 105535 AGUSTIN, BRYAN N
2 105587 ARACYANG, SONY BING P
3 105544 ARACYANG, WILLIAM L
4 105568 CAWI, MARCIAL P
5 105543 CHONGAEL, GERALDO D
6 105530 DACPANO, RIZALDY G
7 105529 DANGLOSE, JILL P
8 105501 DOMINGO, PATRICIA LYNNE KATE N
9 105528 DUMAGUIN, YVES TYRONE R
10 105506 ESPINOZA, EMAR RONAN R
11 105527 ESTOESTA, CHRISOLOGO V
12 105554 FLORES, GABRIEL JR C
13 105567 LUPAIS, ROWENA A
14 105525 MALDIS, FRANCIS JR B
15 105590 MANANGAN, GLENDA C
16 105562 NABUTIL, ANELISA D
17 105521 NADIAHAN, ROMEL L
18 105583 OLIQUIANO, NIO-MAR C
19 105538 PENCHON, SEAN DAVID M
20 105565 RAQUEPO, JESUS WILLIAM M
21 105502 REFUERZO, JERRY M
22 105559 SARAZA, LEONIDES J
23 105553 TAGUBA, JOENARD P
24 105563 WING-NGA, JOSE JR C
* * * * * NOTHING FOLLOWS * * * * *


Region 5 (Legazpi City)


1 220055 ALBEUS, CYLENE M
2 220054 ANGELES, MICHAEL ANGELO A
3 220280 ARE, PAUL HARVEN L
4 220086 AREVALO, LUIS A
5 220073 ARGUMIDO, MILACEL M
6 220008 ASEJO, MARLON A
7 220069 ASIS, GODSENT PAUL II V
8 220203 ATAG, SHIERIDAN L
9 220241 AYALA, JULIUS B
10 220208 BAJADA, MARIA RITCHEL F
11 220254 BALINTONG, RAMON A
12 220139 BALLON, GREGORIO LOUIS C
13 220096 BANICO, ILINE R
14 220102 BARRAMEDA, HENRISON L
15 220004 BAS, JEFFERSON M
16 220206 BAÑARES, EUGENIO E
17 220070 BELISTA, EMIL G
18 220131 BELO, ROSBIL-ROBERT Z
19 220124 BOTIN, RICO F
20 220185 BRITANICO, JUAN B
21 220277 CALAMPIANO, ANGELO A
22 220038 CANDIDATO, CATHERINE C
23 220009 CARDIÑO, JOSEPH CIRYL R
24 220030 CARULLO, ROBERT C
25 220188 CASTUERA, DEOGENES B
26 220066 CATURA, ALLAN DC
27 220191 CELINO, REBECCA L
28 220011 CELLONA, MA LOURDES C
29 220200 CENITA, DANILO A
30 220005 CERILLO, MARLON JR B
31 220016 CO, MICHAEL B
32 220260 COLARINA, SANTOS ALBERTO JR B
33 220272 CONDA, LOIDA C
34 220093 COS, GERMAN G
35 220118 DAGARAT, DOMILENE A
36 220080 DAITOL, NICKSTER M
37 220228 DE LIMA, MARIA CRISTINA T
38 220127 DE LOS SANTOS, ANN FRANCES G
39 220064 DEL BARRIO, SHEENA C
40 220193 DELA PEÑA, MARIBEL A
41 220037 DENIEGA, MELCHOR E
42 220265 DUCUT, HAROLD B
43 220232 EBONES, JAYSON A
44 220221 FERNANDEZ, NOLI A
45 220061 GAGNI, MARK ANTHONY B
46 220256 GANIOLA, JOMMEL M
47 220217 GARRIDO, ARMAND BRYAN S
48 220233 GIDUCOS, FELIPE JR M
49 220209 GONZALES, ROBERT B
50 220273 GRAJO, KEVIN R
51 220132 IBAYAN, FRANCIS C
52 220141 ISRAEL, JOHN CLARENCE T
53 220220 LANA, IVAN M
54 220235 LOREJO, RUSSEL LORENZO R
55 220136 LOÑOSA, YADNI AYESHA V
56 220234 LUNA, JOEL M
57 220183 MADRIGAL, ANTONIO S
58 220160 MAGDASOC, RICHARD L
59 220029 MAHILUM, ROLANDO A
60 220197 MARTIREZ, LARRY T
61 220021 MATA, GERARD ANTHONY M
62 220143 MAÑO, LOVELY M
63 220017 MEDINA, HANNIBAL JR F
64 220167 MEDINA, JED B
65 220007 MEDINA, NIKKO ANDREW F
66 220169 MOLINA, MARK C
67 220039 NANALE, FRANCIA V
68 220249 NIDUA, MARLON D
69 220115 NOBLE, EUGENE PHILIP E
70 220225 OBIAS, HERBERT JR B
71 220178 OBO, PRINCESS T
72 220133 OJEDA, CHERRIE A
73 220172 OLAT, RANDY T
74 220126 OPEMIA, RICO B
75 220246 ORLINA, JUAN PAOLO O
76 220196 PARES, MAXIMINO JR A
77 220089 PEPITO, CELESTINO Y
78 220213 PERALTA, JOSEPH A
79 220014 PERALTA, ROMNICK N
80 220176 PLOPINIO, CARLO M
81 220094 RADA, GERALENE O
82 220192 RAMBOYONG, MERLY S
83 220023 RAMIZO, ANSELMO D
84 220101 RAÑOLA, MICHAEL IAN R
85 220048 REBOYA, ARCE MATHEW J
86 220245 REDRICO, FRANZ JOSEF R
87 220091 RELOCANO, ARCHIE VEDA P
88 220163 ROMERO, ARVIN LINDSEY A
89 220046 SABOCO, SANDRA C
90 220154 SINADJAN, RAUL JR B
91 220149 TABIRARA, ALAIN MIKHAIL F
92 220274 TABUG, RUVIR C
93 220219 TAMAYO, ROVEL L
94 220210 VALENCIA, REDISON O
95 220156 VALENCIA, RENE V
96 220173 VALENCIA, ROXANNE O
97 220119 VALEZA, JOEY T
98 220078 VERGARA, RUBILYN S
99 220184 YU, MARY JOY R
* * * * * NOTHING FOLLOWS * * * * *


Region 6 (Iloilo City)


1 250048 ALOJIPAN, VICENTE P
2 250080 ALOLOR, ALFIE N
3 250065 BANDOQUILLO, HEIDE MAY S
4 250047 BAUTISTA, MARTIN P
5 250056 BUQUIA, ROBERTO V
6 250064 BUQUIA, ROMEO V
7 250017 CALDEO, MA RIZA PHEBO B
8 250019 CONEJAR, HERCON F
9 250154 CUSTODIO, CHERRY D
10 250120 DAIRO, RENE E
11 250060 DARADAR, NIXON A
12 250052 DELA CRUZ, VICENTE P
13 250036 DELFIN, RONALDO G
14 250043 DONGUINES, JULIUS O
15 250082 ECHAVEZ, NIKO MIGUEL P
16 250084 ELGARIO, PETER JUN T
17 250107 ERBITO, JANE A
18 250147 FUENTES, ALLAN REY S
19 250008 HAUDAR, ANGELO P
20 250079 JIMENO, DIMPSY S
21 250003 JULAO, CRIS ANGELO T
22 250132 LADAO, BRIAN C
23 250038 LESCANO, STALIN SR P
24 250006 MAGLIQUIAN, MARY GRACE S
25 250161 MAGPUSAO, JAY MICHAEL J
26 250032 MAGUAD, JOSEPH H
27 250167 MARTIN, FRITZ JOYCE S
28 250130 MIRABOLO, RUTHER JOHN E
29 250070 OBERA, WINSTON P
30 250021 OLISCO, CHARLOTTE L
31 250085 POSADAS, ERWIN A
32 250045 SABRAN, ARIEL R
33 250034 SALANIO, EDDIE S
34 250119 SENON, RALPH MICHAEL S
35 250106 SILVA, CHRISTINE F
36 250050 SOURIBIO, FILOMENO JR S
37 250054 SUPERAL, RONALD I
38 250162 TAYHON, SHELITO G
39 250157 TECSON, ARNI A
40 250111 TIAD, CYRUS P
41 250123 VALDEVIA, JERSON A
42 250074 VILLAJIN, REYMAR J
43 250109 ZAMORA, SILVERIO III G
* * * * * NOTHING FOLLOWS * * * * *


Region 7 (Cebu City)


1 280088 ABOY, EDGAR E
2 280107 AMIDA, ARNEL A
3 280130 ARANAS, MARLOU M
4 280110 AYHON, JOSHUA RYAN M
5 280114 BANTUGAN, EDUARDO T
6 280094 BANTUGAN, VICTOR R
7 280052 BRONIOLA, WILFREDO Y
8 280131 CABAHUG, MARY ANN E
9 280045 CADALSO, ANA MARIE C
10 280044 CADAYONA, ELEAZAR JR A
11 280078 CALAMAYA, RONELDA C
12 280120 CALUMPANG, KEIN BRAYN G
13 280068 CAMINOC, AL WILFREN S
14 280105 CAMINOC, WAYNE RYAN S
15 280074 CAMPOS, RONALD B
16 280153 CECE, MICHAEL L
17 280026 CORRALEJO, LUKE RAM P
18 280152 CORTES, LEO MANUEL A
19 280030 ENRIQUEZ, ROMMEL VINCENT T
20 280091 ESPEJO, JET JUMBO C
21 280127 GADAYAN, JERU K
22 280018 JOGARAP, JOYCE KRISTINE Y
23 280125 JUMALON, GIL PRUDENCIO G
24 280079 JUMAMOY, TOMAS JR V
25 280122 MACABANTE, LEAH MAY T
26 280066 MADES, QUIRINO L
27 280138 MARCELINO, FROILAN B
28 280058 MARTEL, EDWIN C
29 280050 MENDEZ, ERLINDA C
30 280062 MONTALBA, CELSO T
31 280124 OYAO, DOMIENIC C
32 280087 PAQUIBOT,ARNIL C
33 280076 PEREZ, ROMMEL M
34 280115 PIÑERO, JULIUS S
35 280143 RAMOS, AQUILIO JR G
36 280100 SAAVEDRA, ORLANDO B
37 280132 SABIJON, GODFREY F
38 280103 SAMANTILLA, FRANCISCO N
39 280142 SUMANOY, KARLVIC JOHN S
40 280029 TAMARRA, ADOLFO M
41 280156 TANTE, JINNYLIND L
42 280054 VELIGANILAO, NICODEMUS JR I
* * * * * NOTHING FOLLOWS * * * * *


Region 9 (Zamboanga City)


1 340023 ABDULSHATAL, BEN-HUR M
2 340171 ABIL, GERARD B
3 340067 ABING, IAN REY P
4 340279 ABUCAY, FRITZ B
5 340002 ALI, BALDAYA M
6 340254 ALVAREZ, ROWEL T
7 340048 ARANETA, LORIE MAE A
8 340020 BARLITA, DANNY D
9 340129 BARRIOS, ELIZA P
10 340164 BAUTISTA, MARY ANNE GALILEE S
11 340032 BAYAWA, GERRY V
12 340175 BERBISADA, JOHN MICHEL B
13 340248 BERNANTE, LEGASPI A
14 340225 BERONDO, MARK RONALD D
15 340133 BUGAY, JOFFERSON C
16 340137 CABANAG, MELBINA A
17 340005 CALANDRIA, JAN VINCENT D
18 340059 CAMPILIS, ROMMEL J
19 340236 CAPITAN, EDUARDO B
20 340094 CRUZ, GENESIS S
21 340229 DAMILES, EMILLE F
22 340198 DAMO-AG, EL B
23 340014 DE LEON, ROBIN E
24 340110 DEANG, JANICE A
25 340047 DIAMAL, DAUD L
26 340258 DITCHON, PHILIP B
27 340267 EDIANG, ADREN R
28 340028 ESPINOSA, KAREN CHELLE ST
29 340271 ESTRADA, JOYCER REMUS P
30 340139 FAUSTINO, MARIVIC S
31 340010 FRANCISCO, GINNO ALEXIS B
32 340011 GAMBOA, FRANCISCO A
33 340031 GIMONY, ILUMINADO JR J
34 340144 GUERRERO, REJOICE LUNINGNING M
35 340072 HALIRIN-AQUILINO, JAKE V
36 340136 HASSAN, KARL MIKKO M
37 340083 HERNANDEZ, MARLON J
38 340007 JARALVE, JAIME JR M
39 340017 JIMENEZ, ADOLFO S
40 340065 LAMAG, RONNIE H
41 340108 LODOVICE, KRISTLER G
42 340143 MAGHUYOP, MARK ANTHONY O
43 340013 MANGAYA-AY, EUSEBIO JR T
44 340131 MARAMAG, EDUARDO JR A
45 340149 MARTINEZ, ROGELIO C
46 340213 MASCARIÑAS, NORINA N
47 340111 MOROSCALLO, ARNEL JR M
48 340120 MUSIL, APOLINAR S
49 340224 NASIAD, ASEA P
50 340089 NGAPAS, ESHAK M
51 340208 NICE, MICHELLE S
52 340234 NOBLE, ALDRIN CRISTOFFER P
53 340033 NOBLE, PERCIVAL U
54 340172 OLASIMAN, IMEE GRACE T
55 340016 OLIS, SHEENA B
56 340272 OMPOC, TONY J
57 340115 ORDINARIA, RAYMOND L
58 340275 ORDOÑEZ, ELVIRA P
59 340039 ORPIANO, BERNARDO JR D
60 340078 PANANGLITAN, ELIEZER C
61 340018 PASCUA, MANNY C
62 340130 PONTILAR, NORALYN E
63 340075 RAMOS, AMADIS JOHN S
64 340037 REBOLLOS, REY-AN O
65 340004 ROJAS, JEROME M
66 340178 ROMANILLOS, JULIUS T
67 340255 RUIZ, JAN HENRIK B
68 340150 SADJAIL, ADZPAR C
69 340233 SALDON, NOEL I
70 340054 SOLAMILLO, RHEASEL S
71 340226 TAGAYAN, AL-KHAN A
72 340090 TANDING, JOHANNA C
73 340194 TEDOY, RIO MARK O
74 340156 TOLCIDAS, JERAN P
75 340140 TUBALLA, ARYZA DEKA V
76 340113 VALENTE, ALEXANDER B
77 340064 VILLAMIL, JASER A
78 340117 VILLANUEVA, FRANCIS MARCO O
* * * * * NOTHING FOLLOWS * * * * *


Region 11 (Davao City)


1 400162 AGUHAR, RONALD M
2 400156 ALI, ABRAHAM U
3 400071 ALMONIA, ROGER P
4 400099 AMBALGAN, RIZALDY P
5 400081 AMPATUAN, JET D
6 400035 BALENA, MICKAEL RONAN L
7 400097 BALUDIO, RODRIGO T
8 400078 BASIGSIG, FERDINAND SR C
9 400133 BATINO, REYNOLD S
10 400093 BERCERO, DANIEL E
11 400108 BERGAVERA, RYAN E
12 400146 BORJA, MICHELLE B
13 400140 BOTANAS, FERVIN CHUAN T
14 400050 BUEN, ROSELLE LYNN Y
15 400175 CAGALITAN, RANDOLF T
16 400173 CAGALITAN, RICHELL JUNE T
17 400144 CARVAJAL, LYNDON O
18 400001 CHINANOG, CLIFTON O
19 400005 COLANTRO, JOSE ELMER A
20 400095 CONDE, ROGELIO M
21 400051 CORPUZ, LUCIA P
22 400154 CUNANAN, RAYMOND A
23 400086 DASAS, RUSSEL MICHAEL D
24 400063 DE GUMA, DEXTER S
25 400153 DE QUIA, ELEAZAR JR D
26 400085 DELGADO, KHRISTHER S
27 400106 DELOS REYES, GLENN MARK B
28 400184 DELOS SANTOS, MARJORIE L
29 400134 DEMORITO, ALDRIN B
30 400145 DOMINGUEZ, RONIE R
31 400167 DONGUINES, JEORGE LEONARDO D
32 400118 DURAN, ERNAND STEVE C
33 400036 FLORES, RALF CLEVEN L
34 400047 GARCIA, ALLAN E
35 400091 GAURANA, GLENDA R
36 400080 GETIZO, ROY R
37 400109 GOGO, TONG M
38 400165 GORGONIO, HERBERT D
39 400177 GUINITA, JERRYL Z
40 400168 JUSI, JOVELYN A
41 400004 LAM-OSEN, LITO S
42 400045 LAQUIHON, CYRIL T
43 400094 MACALINTANGUI, SHURFIKHAR ALIH U
44 400025 MANGROBANG, FLOR G
45 400130 MANLUPIG, BERNIE D
46 400032 MANTONG, GALLEN REY A
47 400072 MAPILI, REY S
48 400056 MARI, EARL NELSON D
49 400137 MEDITAR, AL BIN OMAR O
50 400171 MIER, NUMERIANO JR A
51 400104 MOKTAR, MOHAMMAD A
52 400041 MUDOC, EUGENE A
53 400185 NEQUINTO, CIELITO L
54 400002 NICOR, LOUIE M
55 400096 PALMA, PORFERIO JR S
56 400150 PONGASE, SIXTO II G
57 400023 POTE, WILFREDO R
58 400054 RANGAS, MA. RUBIE O
59 400142 REYES, JUNE JANE T
60 400135 SARANDA, ALWAFFY M
61 400107 SATO, GEMMELYN A
62 400124 SORIANO, RYAN V
63 400138 TAN, JOAHNA ANTOINETTE T
64 400170 TEMBLOR, DAZZLE Z
65 400169 TOGONON, LEAH BIANCA S
66 400158 TOLING, LLOYD ANTHONY V
67 400132 UCHI, LERDINAND C
68 400148 USMAN, AL-JORDAN F
69 400044 VILLARAIZ, STYX IKE A
70 400102 YEE, GERALD D
* * * * * NOTHING FOLLOWS * * * * *


National Capital Region (Quezon City)


1 460296 ABAOAG, LEVI M
2 460383 ABELIDA, ELY A
3 460323 ACHAY, FERNANDO C
4 460268 ACOSTA, NESTOR B
5 460119 AGUILAR, ROBERT B
6 460121 ALADIN, GERALD V
7 460186 ALAMARES, CRISTOPHER A
8 460364 ALMARIO, JELANIE C
9 460439 ANCHETA, SYLVANA E
10 460045 AQUINO, FLORANTE T
11 460433 ARDIZA, NORMAN S
12 460357 AREVALO, AIMEE S
13 460427 AREVALO, JOEY B
14 460131 ARGUELLES, GRETA C
15 460074 AVILA, ANTONIO M
16 460092 BAJAR, PAULINE S
17 460084 BALANGA, RONNEL C
18 460104 BALE, RONIE A
19 460441 BALLON, HARRY C
20 460233 BANGUG, JOSE JR B
21 460319 BARBOSA, BERNADETH O
22 460483 BARROZO, CLEMENTE JR U
23 460473 BAUTISTA, GILBERT B
24 460026 BERIÑA, ANTONIO E
25 460030 BORJA, DON GLENN S
26 460023 BOSQUE, KONI G
27 460475 CABALLERO, SIR JOHN T
28 460242 CABALTERA, MARK DEXTER S
29 460344 CABANLIT, ERNESTO N
30 460322 CAJANO, MARY JULIE ANNE B
31 460337 CAPISTRANO, RODOLFO KIM V
32 460096 CASASOS, RHANEE BOY L
33 460033 CASILIHAN, ARLENE I
34 460024 CASTILLO, ROSE ANN F
35 460287 CATAGA, RONALDO C
36 460226 CATAJAY, FRANCIS ELMO M
37 460376 CAVENTA, HARVEY V
38 460218 CHU, ALBERTO JR B
39 460327 CIRUELA, ANGELICA S
40 460446 CLACIO, GERRY R
41 460274 CLACIO, LOVELY B
42 460163 COPES, ELISIO T
43 460094 CORPUZ, ARVIN G
44 460185 CUADRANTE, BOBBY R
45 460118 CUENCO, MARIA CLARA B
46 460382 CUMALING, SHERYL VENUS D
47 460064 DANSECO, NOBER D
48 460230 DAVID, DIANA C
49 460048 DAVID, NOEL R
50 460334 DE JURAS, LUIS JR S
51 460449 DE LEON, MYRALIE A
52 460315 DE VERA, JOSEPH P
53 460020 DELA CRUZ, RICARDO JR M
54 460403 DELAGAN, MARINO JR A
55 460103 DELORIA, CAROLINA C
56 460422 DELOS REYES, IAN A
57 460312 DIAZ, ROMER E
58 460177 DIONELA, LUISA L
59 460286 DOLLETON, WENDY R
60 460443 DOMAGAS, ROGELIO G
61 460299 DOROL, BILLY JAY N
62 460490 ELCA, PAULO GLENN B
63 460014 ESMERALDA, EDDIE N
64 460051 ESTUYA, LESLIE S
65 460317 FALLARIA, JOHN LOU P
66 460049 FALOGME, JAYPEE F
67 460447 FESARIT, GILBERT JR F
68 460266 FLORES, APRIL ANNA A
69 460252 FLORES, JAKE ANTHONY A
70 460107 FRESCO, NEIL CHRISTIAN CYRUS M
71 460140 GABION, VON RYAN G
72 460219 GAGARIN, ALBERT L
73 460128 GAMAYAO, SERGIO JR G
74 460246 GATDULA, DONN HERMOSO II A
75 460308 GENTALLAN, JUANITO D
76 460272 GUARTE, JANINE G
77 460261 GUEVARRA, AILEEN C
78 460406 GUEVARRA, JOHN ERNEST V
79 460006 GUILLERMO, JOHNSON D
80 460124 GUITTOB, ANGIE V
81 460388 GUTIERREZ, ENRIQUE SJ
82 460028 HELOTIN, AMIEL JAY M
83 460293 HILARIA, BEN E
84 460129 INDIANA, LESLIE C
85 460122 JARAVATA, DWIGHT JR M
86 460254 JOSE, GERARD A
87 460189 JOSUE, CONNIE C
88 460431 JUMAQUIO, JIM-JAY R
89 460478 LAMIAO, FRANCISCO REDENTOR B
90 460095 LANDICHO, BRANDON L
91 460204 LANZAR, FLORITA AVELINA M
92 460369 LAPUZ, LOYD L
93 460386 LAPUZ, ROMMEL D
94 460003 LASAM, ANAVIE S
95 460335 LAUDENCIA, JOHN LORD C
96 460187 LAURETA, RICHARD A
97 460088 LEONES, TEODULO JR C
98 460245 LOCQUIAO, VICTORIA R
99 460206 LOPEZ, CHRISTIAN JOHN H
100 460367 LOPEZ, HIROHITO M
101 460145 LOPEZ, JAN VINCENT H
102 460086 LOQUE, DICK T
103 460170 LUGO, REYMUNDO U
104 460288 MACABASAG, ARIEL C
105 460112 MACALALAD, FERDINAND A
106 460017 MADELAR, HADRIAN D
107 460071 MAGBUTAY, ARIES T
108 460341 MAGNO, JENREY A
109 460169 MANANSALA, CORAZON E
110 460372 MANCOL, LESTER JOHN A
111 460217 MANGULABNAN, CYRINE G
112 460195 MARBIBI, GUILLERMO III A
113 460168 MARQUEZ, LUISITO H
114 460438 MARTIN, ARTEMIO M
115 460194 MEDINA, MARY ANN A
116 460153 MEJOS, CLAUDIO F
117 460062 MENDEZ, GERWIN D
118 460220 MENDOZA, RUDY JR M
119 460482 MERCADO, CARL LOUIS M
120 460054 MINDANAO, MEYNARDO C
121 460146 MIRANDA, ERIKA M
122 460144 NARAG, ROSEMARIE B
123 460130 OBED, MELANIE M
124 460457 ODVIAR, JED NATHANIEL F
125 460102 OMPOC, JOSE III R
126 460253 ONATO, VICTORINO M
127 460392 ORDOÑA, CARMELA M
128 460430 PANCHO, JENNIFER J
129 460476 PANGANIBAN, DARREN R
130 460435 PANGANIBAN, IRENE T
131 460469 PANGANIBAN, NEIL L
132 460324 PANOPIO, AGERICO P
133 460257 PAREJA, HAROLD E
134 460046 PENEYRA, ANDREW A
135 460460 PONCIANO, EMMYLOU A
136 460445 PONCIANO, ERIKA JOY A
137 460432 POSTANES, JOSEPH C
138 460468 POTESTADES, SONIER R
139 460405 PRECILLA, FORTUNE A
140 460058 PUCYUTAN, MARCIANO JR M
141 460166 PUJOL, FRANCISCO JR T
142 460179 QUEMA, RESURRECCION JR P
143 460424 RAMOS, MISSIELLE N
144 460282 RECAMARA, AGNES A
145 460143 RED, EDUARDO D
146 460032 REGUDO, BEVVY JILL XENIA G
147 460379 RESURRECCION, DONNABELLE L
148 460450 REYES, JESUSA B
149 460067 REYES, SIMON LUIS V
150 460101 RONCESVALLES, ELIZAR P
151 460053 ROSALES, ALLAN A
152 460133 ROXAS, SUSAN R
153 460463 RUSIT, ROGELIO V
154 460007 SABADO, KRISTOFFER C
155 460043 SABIO, ARNULFO B
156 460368 SAHAGUN, ARNOLD A
157 460076 SALAGAN, EDGAR T
158 460134 SAMSON, REYNALDO M
159 460401 SANTOS, EDELWEISS A
160 460284 SERRANO, MARCELINO A
161 460277 SILAGAN, DARINEL B
162 460276 SOBAYNO, RYAN B
163 460259 SORIANO, NICOMEDES JR M
164 460258 SORIANO, TRACY B
165 460157 TALLUNGAN, WILLIAM JAYSON F
166 460050 TEMANIL, ARTHUR G
167 460359 TORRES, LARRY C
168 460481 TORRES, ROLAND RUSSELL P
169 460113 TUBIL, FELIX A
170 460462 TUKLING, CRIZTER A
171 460354 TUMPALAN, JULIUS L
172 460343 UY, GENEROSO M
173 460470 VELASCO, ERICKSON M
174 460260 VICENCIO, PACIFICO JR S
175 460205 VILAGA, FERNAN R
176 460371 ZABALA, DAISY M
177 460294 ZARAGOSA, DANTE R
178 460303 ZINAMPAN, JOHNNY B
* * * * * NOTHING FOLLOWS * * * * * 


CARAGA Region


1 520038 ABITONA, ALONA T
2 520069 ACABO, ROEL G
3 520168 ALIANZA, SHERWIN ERIC D
4 520139 ALON, HONEYLET C
5 520043 AMANEO, DAISYME M
6 520098 AMBE, BJORN HOMAR B
7 520106 ANDOY, JOHN EST CARL C
8 520127 ASIÑERO, RODEL M
9 520049 ASILUM, EDDIE BOY D
10 520055 AUZA, DIOVIN C
11 520032 AUZA, MARIA TERESA L
12 520145 AVILA, MACARIO JR B
13 520063 BLASQUEZ, RONNEL P
14 520017 CALO, RICO R
15 520109 CHAN, ROY V
16 520070 CUARTERO, MARISON R
17 520045 DEGUITO, LUCENA A
18 520040 DELA CUESTA, IVY R
19 520078 EDER, VARKELY B
20 520035 ENOYA, JUN BENJAMEN V
21 520041 FLORES, SHERWIN A
22 520157 FORMARAN, RENNAN P
23 520060 FUNELAS, DENNIS M
24 520005 GALLARDO, AILYN T
25 520027 GOYONGCO, MARISSA L
26 520028 GUANZON, MONETTE F
27 520158 GUARDE, JETH CHRISTINE U
28 520042 GUILLEN, ARIEL B
29 520079 IBARRA, JOIE O
30 520142 JACOB, JAY-ANN S
31 520023 JAVIER, JADE IAN R
32 520011 LIBASTE, ROMMEL G
33 520072 LIM, ADRIAN M
34 520173 MALINAO, NEIL P
35 520115 MOCORRO, EDGARDO ANTONIO JR T
36 520088 MONTES, JERICO CLODUALDO A
37 520020 MORAN, KENNETH BRIAN C
38 520117 MULAWAN, REY R
39 520053 MUTIA, ROBERT Y
40 520152 NAVALLO, ANDHONNY M
41 520165 NICOLAS, JOSIEMER G
42 520036 PABUHOT, ANGELOU C
43 520136 PACATANG, JOHNEL Y
44 520067 PARAGUYA, JOEL A
45 520179 PEPINO, JENEVIVE R
46 520138 PEREZ, NOERIE Y
47 520071 SALINO, REYFE C
48 520047 SALVA, TEOFILO JR R
49 520003 SILVOSA, JANRYSARE L
50 520151 TONERA, KIM G
51 520096 YU, JEFF L
* * * * * NOTHING FOLLOWS * * * * *

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